DoD Chesapeake Bay Program

2018 Watershed Success Stories

Clean Water

Improving Wastewater Processing

Improving Wastewater Processing
In 2012, Camp Fretterd Readiness Center (MD ARNG) was issued a new wastewater permit with stricter ammonia limits. The existing septic system could not meet the new requirements. As a result, the installation constructed the Camp Fretterd Wastewater Treatment Plant. The completed plant now receives and treats wastewater to the required standards before the treated effluent is discharged to groundwater.

Verifying BMPs to Maintain Performance and Credit

Verifying BMPs to Maintain Performance and Credit
JBLE-Eustis (VA) inventoried and inspected 94 existing structural BMPs to determine if the BMPs are functioning as intended. The inspections were performed by qualified inspectors, and the results were compiled in a formal management plan with proposed recommendations. The process improved JBLE-Eustis’ ability to prioritize the necessary maintenance, leverage maintenance funding, and advocate for future funding.

Treating Urban Stormwater with Innovative BMPs

Treating Urban Stormwater with Innovative BMPs
In April 2018, Aberdeen Proving Ground (MD) completed construction of a submerged gravel wetland that treats almost 35 acres of urban land. The BMP was retrofitted from an existing dry pond to a submerged gravel wetland. The practice was selected based on site characteristics and the need for increased nutrient removal. Since the wetland was completed, inspectors have noted wildlife, including deer, blue herons, and frogs congregating around the pond.

Protecting Camp Peary's Shoreline for the Future

Protecting Camp Peary's Shoreline for the Future
In 2016, Camp Peary updated its Shoreline Management Plan. Based on its recommendations, Camp Peary installed benchmarks along four reaches of shoreline in 2018. The data from the benchmarks will allow the installation to track the rate of erosion/recession in these valuable wetland habitats and guide future improvements and repairs to the Camp Peary shoreline.

Abundant Life

Promoting Fish Passage

Promoting Fish Passage
In 2016, the Ewell Road culvert at Mount Creek on Fort A.P. Hill (VA) collapsed after several major storm events, causing upstream ponding, major downstream erosion, and obstruction of passage for anadromous fish species, such as alewife and blue back herring. In 2018, the failed culvert was replaced with three 48-inch concrete pipes, which re-opened 0.94 miles of stream for passage of these important fish species. The upstream and downstream culvert banks were also armored to prevent future erosion and water quality degradation.

Surveying and Tracking Protected Seals in the Chesapeake Bay

Surveying and Tracking Protected Seals in the Chesapeake Bay
NAVFAC Atlantic biologists, in collaboration with local organizations, have completed seasonal surveys around the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel and on the Eastern Shore since 2014. For the 2017-2018 season, 537 seal sightings were recorded, and 7 seals were tagged. This data will provide a better understanding of seal presence and movements near important Navy installations (JEB Little Creek-Fort Story and Naval Station Norfolk) (VA), and their migrations to/from Virginia.

Setting Priorities Based on Surveys

Setting Priorities Based on Surveys
NSA South Potomac- NSF Indian Head (MD) conducts an annual survey to assess the quality of perennial streams at 12 sites through collection and analysis of chemical data and macroinvertebrate and fish identification. The data is compiled in a stream assessment report that is used to guide planning and project implementation. The resulting projects stabilize stream banks, create habitat, and remove blockages for fish passage.

Balancing Mission Readiness and Wetland Protection

Balancing Mission Readiness and Wetland Protection
Joint Base Andrews (MD) created 72 acres of wetlands near Mattawoman Creek to offset impacts to wetlands caused by mission-related activities at the installation. The project is part of a larger effort by Joint Base Andrews to ensure that the necessary operations to maintain our nation’s warfighting capabilities do not lead to a detrimental effect for the overall watershed and ecosystem.

Conserved Land

Army Compatible Use Buffer (ACUB) Program

Army Compatible Use Buffer (ACUB) Program
Fort Indiantown Gap (PA) protected 7,975 acres of unbroken forested habitat through a conservation easement under its ACUB program. Through a partnership with the Nature Conservancy and Capital Region Water, the DeHart Reservoir project preserves habitat for multiple state and federal threatened and endangered species, a globally important bird habitat, and high-quality streams and wetlands that serve as a drinking water source for surrounding communities.

Conserving Forest Around NSA South Potomac - NSF Dahlgren

Conserving Forest Around NSA South Potomac – NSF Dahlgren
Through the REPI program and in partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and the Trust for Public Lands, NSF Dahlgren (VA) created a 653-acre conservation easement that includes over 70 acres of forested land. The protected area provides important scenic conservation value for travelers through the area, along with habitat for various types of fora and fauna.

Protecting Flora and Fauna at Langley Air Field

Protecting Flora and Fauna at Langley Air Field
JBLE-Langley (VA), in cooperation with the City of Hampton and the Federal Action Contingency Trust Fund of Virginia conserved 58.4 acres of land through the REPI program. The conserved land includes almost 20 acres of non-tidal emergent and 22 acres of tidal wetlands. The conserved land protects a variety of wildlife and likely contains habitat for state-endangered bat species. In addition to preventing the encroachment of incompatible uses, the site provides room for retreat in the event of future sea level rise.

Finding Multiple Benefits Through Conservation

Finding Multiple Benefits Through Conservation
In 2018, NAS Patuxent River (MD) conserved 12 parcels, totaling 1,677 acres. The parcels will connect existing public lands to create conservation corridors and protect the area’s agricultural lands and rural character within Maryland’s Rural Legacy Areas and the Middle Chesapeake Sentinel Landscape. The conservation easements support the REPI program and DoD goals by ensuring development is compatible with the Navy’s mission while protecting wetlands, forests, endangered species, and water quality.

Engaged Communities

Learning about Agriculture

Learning about Agriculture
In April 2018, the ARNG in VA participated in the 3rd Grade Agriculture Awareness Days at the Virginia Tech Southern Piedmont Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Blackstone, Virginia. More than 400 students, teachers, and parents visited during the two-day event. The event included 15 learning stations and covered topics like soil erosion and the water cycle. ARNG had a station that demonstrated the importance of worms to enhance soil health and composition.

Keeping our Nation's Capital Clean

Keeping our Nation’s Capital Clean
In 2018, Arlington National Cemetery (VA) along with the National Park Service held its second annual clean-up of Memorial Avenue in Arlington, Virginia. In total, eight volunteers removed 17 pounds of trash and debris from the road and nearby greenspaces. The event successfully reduced the chance for pollutants to enter storm drains and subsequently, the Potomac River.

Providing Recreation at MCB Quantico

Providing Recreation at MCB Quantico
MCB Quantico (VA) expanded public access by extending the Breckenridge Bike Trail in FY2018. The Quantico Mountain Bike Club volunteered 1,000 hours to build 15 miles of dirt trails for bicyclists and pedestrians. In August 2018, the trail opened to the public, creating new opportunities to experience and enjoy the extensive natural areas found at the installation.

DoD Installations Cleaning the Bay

DoD Installations Cleaning the Bay
For the 30th anniversary of Clean the Bay Day, 1,291 military service members and their families at DoD installations Bay-wide joined with local communities to show their commitment to a cleaner and healthier Bay. They cleaned 33 miles of shoreline and removed 28,035 pounds of trash and debris from waterways.

For success stories prior to 2018, please visit the DoD CBP Annual Progress Reports page.