Ordnance Reef Hawai'i

Public Participation

A number of people and a variety of groups contributed to the success of the various Ordnance Reef, Sea Disposal Site Hawai'i 6 (HI-06), studies. Their interest and involvement enabled the team to ensure the primary concerns of affected communities were being considered throughout the studies. These concerns were considered in identifying the area of concern, to planning, to fieldwork, to conducting the human health risk assessment, and during the technology demonstration. This participation brought a wealth of local knowledge and fishing expertise to the study team that otherwise would have been lacking. The study team is particularly grateful for this assistance because it improved the overall quality of the studies and set an example of cooperation in meeting scientific and community goals.

The Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council, formed in 2007, provided a forum to gather information on community concerns, present the approaches being considered and the results of the work completed. The Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council is comprised of representatives of the Department of Defense (DoD), Hawai'i Department of Health, Hawai'i Department of Land and Natural Resources, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), stakeholders from the local community, and the City and County of Honolulu. The first task undertaken by the Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council was a review of the 2006 NOAA Ordnance Reef (HI-06) screening-level survey (Remote Sensing Survey and Sampling at a Discarded Military Munitions (DMM) Sea Disposal Site) and related documents, and possible courses of action to address concerns the Wai'anae Neighborhood Board raised with regard to discarded military munitions at Ordnance Reef (HI-06).

The Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council held 11 meetings between 2007 and the end of 2010. During these meetings, the community gave valuable input for the Army's consideration as it planned and conducted its investigations. Their input included identifying specific areas of concern to the community, identifying the seafood community members regularly consume, its preparation, the size of a typical seafood meal, and their concern about seasonal effects on how biota present might ingest munitions constituents during different seasons.

Other community outreach included engaging various community groups such as churches, civic organizations, schools, and presence at community events. Distributions included the U.S. Army's comprehensive 3Rs (Recognize, Retreat, and Report) Explosives Safety Educational pamphlets, Fact Sheets, and both the Defense Information Exchange (DENIX) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) websites. Questions and comments were documented and submitted to USACE and the Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council.

Planned public involvement activities included surveys, and solicitation of comments, questions, and suggestions. These activities took place at community events, neighborhood meetings, and at educational presentations to the various community or civic groups. Information gathered was shared with the Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council to keep them abreast of community issues and concerns.

The Ordnance Reef (HI-06) study team scheduled meetings with various federal, state and local government organizations and agencies. During these meetings, information shared included the planned and completed activities. These meetings were an important tool to gather information and suggestions on what other agencies or groups should be contacted and informed. Informational packets were distributed at these meetings and follow up meetings were scheduled as requested or as updates were available.

Written surveys were conducted to evaluate information for the Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council. Surveys were presented to K-12 students on the Leeward coast. The questions solicited information on levels of awareness of discarded military munitions and the 3Rs of explosive safety.

A number of people and a variety of groups contributed to the success of the various Ordnance Reef, Sea Disposal Site Hawai'i 6 (HI-06), studies. Their interest and involvement enabled the team to ensure the primary concerns of affected communities were being considered throughout the studies. These concerns were considered in identifying the area of concern, to planning, to fieldwork, to conducting the human health risk assessment, and during the technology demonstration. This participation brought a wealth of local knowledge and fishing expertise to the study team that otherwise would have been lacking. The study team is particularly grateful for this assistance because it improved the overall quality of the studies and set an example of cooperation in meeting scientific and community goals.

The Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council, formed in 2007, provided a forum to gather information on community concerns, present the approaches being considered and the results of the work completed. The Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council is comprised of representatives of the Department of Defense (DoD), Hawai'i Department of Health, Hawai'i Department of Land and Natural Resources, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), stakeholders from the local community, and the City and County of Honolulu. The first task undertaken by the Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council was a review of the 2006 NOAA Ordnance Reef (HI-06) screening-level survey (Remote Sensing Survey and Sampling at a Discarded Military Munitions (DMM) Sea Disposal Site) and related documents, and possible courses of action to address concerns the Wai'anae Neighborhood Board raised with regard to discarded military munitions at Ordnance Reef (HI-06).

The Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council held 11 meetings between 2007 and the end of 2010. During these meetings, the community gave valuable input for the Army's consideration as it planned and conducted its investigations. Their input included identifying specific areas of concern to the community, identifying the seafood community members regularly consume, its preparation, the size of a typical seafood meal, and their concern about seasonal effects on how biota present might ingest munitions constituents during different seasons.

Other community outreach included engaging various community groups such as churches, civic organizations, schools, and presence at community events. Distributions included the U.S. Army's comprehensive 3Rs (Recognize, Retreat, and Report) Explosives Safety Educational pamphlets, Fact Sheets, and both the Defense Information Exchange (DENIX) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) websites. Questions and comments were documented and submitted to USACE and the Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council.

Planned public involvement activities included surveys, and solicitation of comments, questions, and suggestions. These activities took place at community events, neighborhood meetings, and at educational presentations to the various community or civic groups. Information gathered was shared with the Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council to keep them abreast of community issues and concerns.

The Ordnance Reef (HI-06) study team scheduled meetings with various federal, state and local government organizations and agencies. During these meetings, information shared included the planned and completed activities. These meetings were an important tool to gather information and suggestions on what other agencies or groups should be contacted and informed. Informational packets were distributed at these meetings and follow up meetings were scheduled as requested or as updates were available.

Written surveys were conducted to evaluate information for the Ordnance Reef Coordinating Council. Surveys were presented to K-12 students on the Leeward coast. The questions solicited information on levels of awareness of discarded military munitions and the 3Rs of explosive safety.