DENIX
Glossary

Glossary

Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) – A congressionally authorized process to close and realign military installations. (DoD Manual 4715.20).

Chemical Agent (CA) – A chemical agent that, through its chemical properties, produces lethal or other damaging effects on human beings, except that such term does not include riot control agents, chemical herbicides, smoke and other obscuration materials. Defined in Title 50 U.S.C. §1521(p)(1).

Chemical Agent Hazard – A condition where danger exists because chemical agent is present in a concentration high enough to present potential unacceptable effects (e.g., damage, death, injury) to people, operational capability, or the environment. Defined in Title 32 CFR 179.3.

Chemical Agent Identification Sets (CAIS) – Military training aids containing small quantities of various chemical agents and other chemicals. Certain kits containing relatively large quantities of chemical agent (i.e., CAIS K941, toxic gas set M-1; and CAIS K942, toxic gas set M-2/E11) are considered CWM. Once recovered, other forms of CAIS are managed and disposed of as hazardous waste. (Definition based on Title 32 CFR 179.3).

Chemical Agent and Munitions Destruction, Defense (CAMD,D) – The appropriation established in Title 50 U.S.C. §1521(n)(3)(B) used by Congress to fund the Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel (RCWM) Program.

Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) – The Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, and its annexes opened for signature on January 13, 1993. Defined in Title 15 CFR 710.1.

Chemical Warfare Materiel (CWM) – Generally configured as a munition containing a chemical compound that is intended to kill, seriously injure, or incapacitate a person through its physiological effects. CWM includes V- and G-series nerve agents or H-series (mustard) and L-series (lewisite) blister agents in other-than-munition configurations; and certain industrial chemicals (e.g., hydrogen cyanide (AC), cyanogen chloride (CK), or carbonyl dichloride (called phosgene or CG)) configured as a military munition. Due to their hazards, prevalence, and military-unique application, chemical agent identification sets (CAIS) are also considered CWM. CWM does not include riot control devices; chemical defoliants and herbicides; industrial chemicals (e.g., AC, CK, or CG) not configured as a munition; smoke and other obscuration-producing items; flame and incendiary-producing items; or soil, water, debris, or other media contaminated with low concentrations of chemical agents where no chemical agent hazards exist. For the purposes of this Protocol, CWM encompasses four subcategories of specific materials:

  • CWM, explosively configured are all munitions that contain a chemical agent fill and any explosive component. Examples are M55 rockets with chemical agent, the M23 VX mine, and the M360 105-mm GB artillery cartridge.
  • CWM, non-explosively configured are all munitions that contain a chemical agent fill, but that do not contain any explosive components. Examples are any chemical munition that does not contain explosive components and VX or mustard agent spray canisters.
  • CWM, bulk container are all non-munitions-configured containers of chemical agent (e.g., a ton container) and CAIS K941, toxic gas set M-1 and K942, toxic gas set M-2/E11.
  • CAIS are military training aids containing small quantities of various CA and other chemicals. All forms of CAIS are scored the same in this rule, except CAIS K941, toxic gas set M-1; and CAIS K942, toxic gas set M-2/E11, which are considered forms of CWM, bulk container, due to the relatively large quantities of agent contained in those types of sets. Defined in Title 32 CFR 179.3.

CWM Site – A munitions response site known or suspected to contain CWM or CAIS.

Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) – The program established by Title 10 U.S.C. § 2701, with the goals of (1) the identification, investigation, research and development, and cleanup of contamination from a hazardous substance or pollutant or contaminant; (2) Correction of other environmental damage (such as detection and disposal of unexploded ordnance) which creates an imminent and substantial endangerment to the public health or welfare or to the environment; and (3) Demolition and removal of unsafe buildings and structures, including buildings and structures of the Department of Defense at sites formerly used by or under the jurisdiction of the Secretary.

Discarded Military Munitions (DMM) – Military munitions that have been abandoned without proper disposal or removed from storage in a military magazine or other storage area for the purpose of disposal. The term does not include unexploded ordnance (UXO), military munitions that are being held for future use or planned disposal, or military munitions that have been properly disposed of consistent with applicable environmental laws and regulations. Defined in Title 10 U.S.C. §2710(e)(2).

DoD Components – The Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Military Departments, the Defense Agencies, the Department Field Activities, and any other Department organizational entity or instrumentality established to perform a government function. Defined in Title 32 CFR 179.3.

Explosives or Munitions Emergency – A situation involving the suspected or detected presence of unexploded ordnance (UXO), damaged or deteriorated explosives or munitions, an improvised explosive device (IED), other potentially explosive material or device, or other potentially harmful military chemical munitions or device, that creates an actual or potential imminent threat to human health, including safety, or the environment, including property, as determined by an explosives or munitions emergency response specialist. Such situations may require immediate and expeditious action by an explosives or munitions emergency response specialist to control, mitigate, or eliminate the threat. Defined in Title 40 CFR 260.10.

Explosives or Munitions Emergency Response – Explosives or munitions emergency response means all immediate response activities by an explosives and munitions emergency response specialist to control, mitigate, or eliminate the actual or potential threat encountered during an explosives or munitions emergency. An explosives or munitions emergency response may include in-place render-safe procedures, treatment or destruction of the explosives or munitions and/or transporting those items to another location to be rendered safe, treated, or destroyed. Any reasonable delay in the completion of an explosives or munitions emergency response caused by a necessary, unforeseen, or uncontrollable circumstance will not terminate the explosives or munitions emergency. Explosives and munitions emergency responses can occur on either public or private lands and are not limited to responses at Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facilities. Defined in Title 40 CFR 260.10.

Explosives or Munitions Emergency Response Specialist – An individual trained in chemical or conventional munitions or explosives handling, transportation, render-safe procedures, or destruction techniques. Explosives or munitions emergency response specialists include DoD emergency explosive ordnance disposal (EOD), technical escort unit (TEU), and DOD-certified civilian or contractor personnel; and other Federal, State, or local government, or civilian personnel similarly trained in explosives or munitions emergency responses. Defined in Title 40 CFR 260.10.

Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS) – A facility or site (property) that was under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of Defense and owned by, leased to, or otherwise possessed by the United States at the time of actions leading to contamination by hazardous substances. The FUDS program is limited to those real properties that were transferred from DoD control prior to October 17, 1986. Properties must be located within the United States. (DoD Manual 4715.20)

Munitions and Certain Materials of Interest – When recovered, includes munitions that contain an unknown liquid fill; certain materials (e.g., laboratory vials, closed cavity containers encountered at a CWM site) that contain an unknown liquid fill; and chemical agent identification sets. (DoDD 5101.17E)

Munitions and Certain Materials of Interest Assessment and Characterization – Generally means those actions required to identify the contents of a recovered munition that contains an unknown liquid fill or, within the United States, of certain materials of interest with an unknown liquid fill.

Military Munitions

All ammunition products and components produced for or used by the armed forces for national defense and security, including ammunition products or components under the control of the DoD, the Coast Guard, the Department of Energy, and the National Guard. Includes:

  • Confined gaseous, liquid, and solid propellants.
  • Explosives, pyrotechnics, chemical and riot control agents, smokes, and incendiaries, including bulk explosives and chemical warfare agents.
  • Chemical munitions, rockets, guided and ballistic missiles, bombs, warheads, mortar rounds, artillery ammunition, small arms ammunition, grenades, mines, torpedoes, depth charges, cluster munitions and dispensers, and demolition charges.
  • Devices and components of any item specified in clauses (i) through (iii).

Does not include:

  • Wholly inert items.
  • Improvised explosive devices.
  • Nuclear weapons, nuclear devices, and nuclear components, other than nonnuclear components of nuclear devices that are managed under the nuclear weapons program of the Department of Energy after all required sanitization operations under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.) have been completed. Defined in Title 10 U.S.C. §101(e)(4).

Military Munitions Burial Site – A site, regardless of location, where military munitions or chemical agent, regardless of configuration, were intentionally buried, with the intent to abandon or discard. This term includes burial sites used to dispose of military munitions or chemical agent, regardless of configuration, in a manner consistent with applicable environmental laws and regulations or the national practice at the time of burial. It does not include sites where munitions were intentionally covered with earth during authorized destruction by detonation, or where in situ capping is implemented as an engineered remedy under an authorized response action. (DoD Manual 6055.09, Volume 8)

Munitions and Explosives of Concern (MEC) – A term that distinguishes specific categories of military munitions that may pose unique explosives safety risks, such as:

Munitions Constituent (MC) – Any materials originating from unexploded ordnance, discarded military munitions, or other military munitions, including explosive and nonexplosive materials, and emission, degradation, or breakdown elements of such ordnance or munitions. (10 U.S.C. 2710(e)(3))

Munitions Response – Response actions, including investigation, removal actions, and remedial actions, to address the explosives safety, human health, or environmental risks presented by unexploded ordnance (UXO), discarded military munitions (DMM), or munitions constituents (MC), or to support a determination that no removal or remedial action is required. Defined in Title 32 CFR 179.3.

Munitions Response Area (MRA) – Any area on a defense site that is known or suspected to contain UXO, DMM, or MC. Examples are former ranges and munitions burial areas. An MRA comprises one or more munitions response sites. Defined in Title 32 CFR 179.3.

Munitions Response Site (MRS) – A discrete location within an MRA that is known to require a munitions response. Defined in Title 32 CFR 179.3.

Non-stockpile – Declared RCWM and both treaty and non-treaty items, such as unfilled munitions, support equipment, and devices designed for use with chemical weapons. These include complete assembled munitions without chemical fill and with or without bursters and fuzes, stimulant-filled munitions, inert munitions, dummy munitions, bursters and fuzes, empty rocket warheads and motors, projectile cases, other metal and plastic part components, research and development compounds, chemical samples, and ton containers. (DoDD 5101.17E)

Planned Response – Actions, other than an explosives or munitions emergency response, planned and undertaken to locate, recover, assess and destroy CWM, munitions and certain materials of interest with an unknown liquid fill, CAIS, or contaminated debris or environmental media that pose a chemical agent hazard. response at a CWM site

Range Clearance – The destruction or removal and proper disposition of used military munitions (e.g., UXO and munitions debris) and other range-related debris (e.g., target debris, military munitions packaging and crating material) to maintain or enhance operational range safety or prevent the accumulation of such material from impairing or preventing operational range use. Does not include removal, treatment, or remediation of chemical residues or munitions constituents from environmental media, or actions to address discarded military munitions (e.g., burial pits) on operational ranges. (DoD Manual 6055.09, Volume 8)

Recovered Chemical Warfare Materiel (RCWM) – CWM used for its intended purpose or previously disposed of as waste that has been discovered during a CWM response or by chance (e.g., accidental discovery by a member of the public), that DoD has secured in place or placed under DoD control. CWM placed under DoD control is normally stored in a DoD Explosive Safety Board approved storage location or interim holding facility, pending final disposition. (DoDD 5101.17E)

RCWM Program – A DoD program executed within the United States by the Secretary of the Army, on behalf of the Office of the Secretary of Defense, to:

  • Respond to explosive and munitions emergencies involving munitions and certain materials of interest that contain an unknown liquid or a chemical agent fill encountered by the public.
  • Investigate and, as required, conduct munitions responses at CWM sites in accordance with the DoD Explosive Safety Board -approved site plan.
  • Investigate and, as required, conduct range clearance activities on operational ranges where munitions and certain materials of interest that contain an unknown liquid or a chemical agent fill are encountered.
  • Non-intrusively assess recovered munitions and certain materials of interest that contain an unknown liquid or chemical agent fill and chemical agent identification sets to determine the most likely fill.
  • Destroy, normally on site, RCWM using an approved technology or procedure. (DoDD 5101.17E)

RCWM Program Support Functions – Functions performed in support of the RCWM Program, including:

  • Procurement and maintenance of mobile equipment and operational capabilities required for the assessment of munitions and certain materials of interest that contain an unknown liquid fill and the destruction of recovered RCWM.
  • Sustainment of the personnel and equipment required for the assessment of munitions and certain materials of interest that contain an unknown liquid fill and the destruction of RCWM.
  • Research, development, test, and evaluation of, and associated improvements to, current technologies and the evaluation of off-the-shelf technologies available to meet RCWM Program requirements.
  • Support of explosives or munitions emergencies that involve munitions and certain materials of interest that contain an unknown liquid fill or CWM and chemical agent identification sets.
  • Archival research of CWM sites. (DoDD 5101.17E)

Scheduled ChemicalsSpecific lists of toxic chemicals, groups of chemicals, and precursors contained in the CWC, and specifically listed in Supplements No. 1 to parts 712 through 714 of the CWC regulations, 15 CFR parts 710 through 729. Defined in Title 15 CFR 710.1.

Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) – Military munitions that-

(A) have been primed, fused, armed, or otherwise prepared for action;

(B) have been fired, dropped, launched, projected, or placed in such a manner as to constitute a hazard to operations, installations, personnel, or material; and

(C) remain unexploded, whether by malfunction, design, or any other cause. Defined in 10 U.S.C. §101(e)(5).

United States – The several States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealths of Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, Guam, Midway and Wake Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, any other territory or possession of the United States, and associated navigable waters, contiguous zones, and ocean waters of which the natural resources are under the exclusive management authority of the United States. (DoDI 4715.06)